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A Mini-Series is a small subset of lessons from a major series which covers a particular subject or book. The class numbers will be in reference to the major series rather than the mini-series.

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Romans (2010)

Romans (2010)

November 2010 - December 2014

Romans has always been one of the favorite books of thoughtful Christians. In this epistle, the apostle Paul logically delineates the foundation and structure of Christian doctrine. The righteousness of God has been accurately identified as the central message of this epistle. How the righteousness of God relates to a human history of suffering, pain, and injustice, has been a frequent question through the ages. In Romans, Paul's answer shows that this question cannot be addressed in a sound bite or executive summary. The character of God, the volition of man, the history of man's rejection of God, must form the backdrop to a serious discussion on the righteousness of God. But an accurate understanding of the righteousness of God also reveals to us the magnificence of God's grace and His gracious plan of justification available freely to all mankind.

But this does not stop with simple justification, but also explains God's righteousness in the life of the believer after salvation and how God's righteousness is vindicated in history as indicated through His faithful love for Israel.

Video DVDs of these lessons can be ordered here and here.

To view all video Bible studies in the Romans series, click here.

To listen to this series as a podcast, copy and paste the following URL into your podcast software.
www.deanbibleministries.org/podcasts/2010romans.xml
 
Thu, Nov 15, 2012
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 7:1-6
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 3 mins 19 secs
Thu, Nov 29, 2012
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:1
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 58 mins 37 secs
Romans 8, one of the greatest chapters in the New Testament, needs to be understood with Galatians 5. Both pertain to the spiritual life. These truths which point out the profound advantages we have in the dispensation of the Church are learned through a growth process requiring study of scripture and conscience application. What is the progression Paul follows from Romans 6 that leads us to the believers’ relationship to the Law in the Church Age and the gift we have that emancipates us from the Law? Chapter 8 focuses on the Holy Spirit as the means to live the Christian life. What is the history behind some translations’ inclusion or exclusion of the second half of Romans 8:1? Does the word “condemnation” apply to justification or temporal punishment? What was the source Jesus used in His life that empowered Him to fulfill the Law and become our pattern for living the spiritual life?
Thu, Dec 13, 2012
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:1-5
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 4 mins 56 secs
We understand that walking by means of the Spirit is not an experience or methodology. It is knowing the eternal reality that you are entirely different and operating from a radical new identity. Our world is not gray. It’s black or white, God’s way or man’s way, and because of our new identity in Christ, we have the power to make choices for a Spirit-filled life that are finely honed with time and application of the Word. The condemnation we escape through our choice of being filled by the Holy Spirit is the punishment in time caused by walking according to the flesh. The problem doesn’t morph with the culture. It remains the Sin Nature, not self esteem, addiction or emotional disorders. Paul’s contrasts are between flesh and spirit, life and death. Our tool to overcome a carnal death in time and achieve life and joy in all circumstances is the Holy Spirit.
Thu, Dec 20, 2012
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:3-11
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 58 mins 35 secs
Context is the key to interpreting Romans 8. Romans 6, 7 and 8 are about how the justified live. Paul uses “flesh” in ways that suggest the location of the corruption of sin is in the body, not the soul. In a similar passage (Galatians 5), as in our passage, the requirement of the Law is love (the basis of all virtues of the Spirit), which is fulfilled in us only as we walk according to the Spirit. For believers, there is a war within between flesh and Spirit. For unbelievers there is no war, only the flesh. That’s one way we know Paul is talking to believers. Unlike Old Testament believers, we are given the power to choose which we will serve. The flesh is a death-like existence in life; the Spirit is life and peace. We are slaves to the one we obey.
Thu, Dec 27, 2012
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:9-11
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 3 mins 45 secs
Is it true that the sin nature is just as powerful in the believer as in the unbeliever? According to different theologies, a “big” sin either makes you lose your salvation, or, if you commit one, you were never saved in the first place. Is there truth in either? See the two types of believers in Romans 8 who are conflicted between the Spirit and the flesh. How do they succeed or fail? When Paul teaches the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, is that indwelling applied to a corporate body, the Church, or does it apply to the individual believer? Learn the difference between permanent sanctification in “indwelling” and temporal volition in “filling.” Were believers in the Old Testament ever permanently indwelt by the Holy Spirit? What were the conditions of their “filling?”
Thu, Jan 03, 2013
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:13-17
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 58 mins 18 secs
In Romans 8:13 we’re told that if we live according to the flesh we must die. Is this eternal death? What are the choices believers make that result in spiritual maturity and life? Is one who proclaims “Jesus' words” while consistently walking in the flesh someone God recognizes as a mature son? Is there a difference in being adopted as a son and inheriting, and between being a child of God and a son of God? How is it that our inheritance, which God has set aside for us, can be thrown into the Lake of Fire? Understand the historical background of adoption and its doctrinal significance as it applies to the Greek and Roman ideas of adoption. Paul will expand on these ideas to show the privileges and obligations of being sons.
Thu, Jan 10, 2013
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:13-17
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 1 mins 4 secs
Fundamental error can creep into scripture boldly, or, as in the interpretation of our passage, on the basis of punctuation alone. Our discussion in Romans concerns believers and the distinction between adoption as children and heirship as sons. As children of God at salvation, by grace, we are all adopted into the family of God as heirs of eternal life with potential for becoming heirs as sons. Because of choice inherent in the word potential, not all will become heirs as sons. Being heirs as sons and joint heirs with Christ requires a choice to pursue spiritual maturity and possible cultural anathema through obedience to Christ. This persistent pursuit results in intimacy with God in time and rewards in eternity. This study details the difference this choice creates among believers and the result it has in time and eternity.
Thu, Jan 17, 2013
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:13-17 & 1 Corinthians 6:9-12
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 58 mins 22 secs
Inheritance in scripture can mean inheritance of salvation as a grace gift, or inheritance as a reward for spiritual growth. See how to discern the difference based on context and vocabulary. Paul hammers the Corinthian believers for lives that were rife with sin, addressing them as carnal. Still, it is clear that Paul is writing to believers. Since believers already have the inheritance of salvation, what inheritance is Paul talking about when he says the unrighteous shall not inherit? Clarify this important distinction which is often ignored to incorrectly illustrate salvation by works. What does Paul say about lawsuits brought by Christians? How does he bring eschatology into an answer which is frequently misunderstood?
Thu, Jan 24, 2013
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:17-18
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 3 mins 12 secs
Suffering is inevitable in the Devil’s world. Suffering isn’t just the agony of a catastrophic event. It includes the spectrum of difficulties in life from annoyances more evident when we’re weary, to those major assaults that wipe us out for long periods. Our response to suffering is the issue, beginning with recognition of God’s authority, encouragement and application of scripture, and possibly a change in behavior. Become familiar with the ten categories of suffering through illustrations of each in scripture. Understand that suffering isn’t always a result of sin, but in all cases it is the hand of a loving God steering a beloved child toward a course of His choosing, to exalt Himself and to protect us through righteous living in time and the expectation of incomparable glory in eternity.
Thu, Feb 07, 2013
by Robert Dean
Passage: Romans 8:17-18
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 58 mins 42 secs
Believers and nonbelievers will suffer. The difference is that believers can be elevated through their suffering. For an unbeliever, suffering begins and ends with the pain. Behind the suffering of a believer is a loving God with a plan to employ the realities of life as a test, a tool, a compass, a motivator or an encouragement to others. A review of the ten reasons why we suffer is an encouragement, not necessarily to pinpoint a specific reason, but to focus on the God behind the reasons and respond with wisdom to what His omniscience permits. Correct orientation to suffering is a means of becoming joint heirs with Christ.